On the Line / Marketing / 20 of the Best Restaurant Logos

20 of the Best Restaurant Logos

Your logo speaks volumes about your brand. Take inspiration from these 20 creative logo designs.

Restaurant logo design

We all know that first impressions matter, and it’s no different in the restaurant industry. After all, we eat with our eyes first!

Restaurant logos are one of the first elements of your restaurant marketing strategy that a potential customer experiences. Your brand is on display 24/7 through social media, your website, and physical signage on location — and having an appealing restaurant logo helps to tie all these elements together.

With all that real estate driven by branding, it’s worth thinking twice about how to be creative with your logo and your restaurant's design identity. 

Whether it’s getting creative through typography like Oodles Noodles Bar, creating characters to incorporate throughout the entire restaurant experience like Yeah! Burger, or representing the culture behind the food like Nyum Bai does, inspiration is everywhere.

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How to Make a Restaurant Logo 

Creating a restaurant logo can seem daunting at first: from the colors to the font and graphics, it’s easy to feel overwhelmed. But, you don’t have to be—creating a plan before you decide to sketch out anything is extremely helpful. First, think about your target audience. Who are they? Where do they like to shop? Do you have an age range in mind? Is your restaurant more for foodies who are into ingredients and techniques, or the average Joe who’s looking for something delicious to eat? The answers to these questions will inform you for your next step.

Now that you know your target audience, think about your brand. How do you want customers to perceive your restaurant? Do you want to be portrayed as classy and elegant, or down-to-earth and family friendly? Think about the emotions you want customers to have when coming into your restaurant and consider colors and typography that evoke these emotions. 

Lastly, think about whether you want to DIY your logo or hire a designer—there are no wrong or right answers here; it’s just a matter of time and budget. Both options have their pros and cons—but if you go the DIY route, Canva is an excellent starting point.

The 20 Most Creative Restaurant Logos

We’ve gathered 20 of the most creative and well-designed restaurant logos that have inspired us - check them out below.

Oodles Noodle Bar

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Oodles Noodle Bar gets creative with typeform. Not only would a customer know exactly what kind of food to expect, but the typography evokes a fun, creative atmosphere for the noodle bar.


Comaxurros

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Comaxurros - a Barcelona restaurant that specializes in churros - uses a set of caricatures to represent their product. The imagery used in their brand development creates a lively experience to highlight the “pastry community” they create. The bright, bold color choice draws attention and epitomizes fun. The typographic logo is simple and allows the illustrations to take center stage.


Yeah! Burger

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Similar to the technique of Comaxurros, Yeah! Burger’s brand identity extends further than a logo and is built with characters and story-driven elements. Creating a visual language, these brand elements are used to educate consumers about their food and where it is coming from in a playful way.


Melty Way

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Icons are a great to represent a restaurant’s specialty. Melty Way uses this visual language to define their brand. Who can resist a great melt with cheese dripping down the slices of bread?

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Torn Label Brewing

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The label on a beer is often what sets one brand apart from another when sitting on retail shelves. Torn Label Brewing takes a spin on this and highlights the label as a part of their brand image and logo mark. The use of negative space within the logo allows the logo to work across several instances and environments.


Marmalade 

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Marmalade exhibits another application of creative typography using food imagery as the letter form. The expressive orange peel logo helps customers build expectation of what they may find at the popular Chicago brunch spot.


Banyan

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Banyan of Boston creates a cohesive experience through every part of their branding. Dubbed a Pan-Asian Gastropub, they’ve created a visual language that mirrors the experience found in the food and physical space.


Main Squeeze

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Demonstrating another use of iconography, Main Squeeze uses their specialty is fresh juices and smoothies as inspiration for their logo: a carrot squeezed by hand - highlighting their emphasis on fresh, unprocessed ingredients.


Bottle + Kitchen

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Bottle + Kitchen uses two side-by-side chef’s knives to create a secondary visual. The wine bottle hidden in the negative space brings to life their vision of great food paired with a great drink.


Yolklore

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Using a design convention such as this dictionary representation allows Yolklore to share their vision of a ‘legendary breakfast’ with their customers. The simple typographic logo is a strong complement to their clever name.


Damn the Weather

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Located in Seattle, WA, Damn the Weather plays off a common fret of the locals. Playing off the name, the simple overturned umbrella iconography positions the restaurant as a place to hang up your coat and enjoy a drink, despite the weather report.


Better Burger

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Better Burger’s intelligent branding goes beyond a their clean, typographic logo mark. Instead, they created brand imagery of a schematic sketch of the perfectly built burger, following the journey of their fresh ingredients. Branding like this opens the opportunity for customers to interact with the packaging, discovering new things and learning more about the restaurant.


Andina

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Continuing with the previous trend, Andina has created an elegant logo mark that shows how design can influence the perception of a brand. Through color, stroke, and typography, this unique brand is created.

Snooze AM Eatery

Snooze, a popular brunch restaurant in Houston, uses 1950s-style typography to denote its casual and fun nature. From the name to the bright and lively orange used in the font, you automatically know that this is a no-frills, welcoming restaurant you can come to — long after you’ve hit the snooze button.


Nyum Bai

If you thought of Southeast Asia when seeing Nyum Bai’s (which is Khmer for “eat rice”) logo, then the restaurant has done their job in conveying what they’re serving without ever stepping foot. This Cambodian restaurant in Oakland, CA uses a simple typography reminiscent of Southeast Asia to draw potential diners in, and the use of soft coral is inviting. 


The Codfather

Playing off of the iconic Godfather typography, this casual food truck in Reno, Nevada keeps it fun and light with the puns and delightfully chill cod.


Like No Udder

And speaking of puns, this ice cream shop in Providence, RI uses a fun logo, clever word play, and family-friendly colors to convey a playful, humorous vibe that’s appropriate for all ages.


Basic Kneads Pizza

More puns ahead: Basic Kneads uses them (and their logo with a mountain background) to denote that they’re a pizza shop (and as an ode to their location in Denver, CO).


Party Fowl

Specializing in Nashville hot chicken, Party Fowl’s fun rustic typography in red lends a casual, come-as-you-are vibe, and signals that you’re bound to have a great time (and feel a little heat from the hot chicken in the process!)


Pies-n-Thighs

Pies-n-Thighs freeform, carefree take on the retro vibe gives a spirited air to this NYC restaurant that specializes in fried chicken accompanied by homemade sides.


Teranga

Vibrant colors and a typography that doesn’t take itself seriously is crucial to Teranga’s low-key approach. This West African eatery’s logo is just a glimpse of what you’ll experience in store once you visit—colorful wax prints used as decor, Instagrammable food, and tropical plants that evoke paradise and slow living. 


& Sons Ham Bar

The slightly cursive typography and seamless integration between the ampersand and the text is a prelude to what you’ll experience at &Sons, an intimate 20-seat restaurant that’s intentional without the haughtiness. 

Put Your Designer Hat On

While there are many facets to consider while planning a restaurant, your logo is more important than you think. A restaurant's logo reflects your concept, ambiance, and menu so plan, execute, and have fun.

Restaurant Marketing Plan
icon RESOURCE

Restaurant Marketing Plan

Create a marketing plan that'll entice and engage the customers you want with this customizable marketing plan template and interactive calendar from Toast.

Download
You must have Javascript enabled in order to submit forms on our website. If you'd like to contact Toast please call us at:

(857) 301-6002
First and Last Name is required
Phone Number is required
Restaurant Name is required
What is your role? is required
Yes, I’d like a demo of Toast, a restaurant technology platform.
Yes, I'd like a demo of Toast is required
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